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CRESA Announces Life Saving Awards

As a 911 center, we often forget to celebrate our successes. 911 Dispatchers wholeheartedly believe they signed up to do the good work, provide instructions to save lives, and walk people through terrible situations until help arrives.  The list of what is expected of a 911 dispatcher goes on and on while ever changing each day on the job.  While providing all of above duties, dispatchers are required to follow protocols to the letter.

The job of a 911 dispatcher, most of the time is a thankless role.  Dispatchers assist until First Responders arrive.  Once help physically arrives, the dispatcher in onto the next call, and many times never hears the outcome of those they helped provide assistance to. Sometimes however, we are made aware of those outcomes and the roles that the dispatcher played in saving a life.  These calls are reviewed for what CRESA calls the “Life Saving Award.”

To be considered for the CRESA Life Saving Award,  the following criteria must be met:

  • Patient must be released from the hospital
  • Quality Assurance (QA) panel reviews the call
  • Medical Dispatch Review Committee comprised of CRESA QA staff,
  • the County Medical Program Director’s Assistant, and an American Medical Response Supervisor review the call
  • Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) protocols must be followed to the exact wording
  • Panel reviews the call, verifying the dispatcher met and followed the protocol to the letter, AND the patient lived to be released from the hospital.

If a dispatcher meets all of the above criteria, they are awarded the Life Saving Award.

While we are prohibited from releasing patient information, CRESA proudly to announces the following Life Saver Award Winners:

Michelle O’Malley – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in July with a patient who was not conscious and not breathing

Tonya Campbell – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in July with a patient was not conscious and not breathing

Jackie Piggott – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in April with a patient who was unconscious and exhibited agonal breathing

Zach Helmes – recently certified Dispatcher – his lifesaving efforts in April when he assisted a teen that was choking and in February when he provided triage instructions for a patient that was not breathing

Carrie Johnson – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in April for a patient who collapsed and needed assistance with an AED; another in February where Carrie assisted with a patient who passed out and was not breathing

Kim Earls – Dispatch Trainee – her lifesaving efforts in April for a patient that was short of breath experiencing chest pain

Memorie Sanders – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in March for a non-responsive, agonal breathing patient

Ryan Sayne – Dispatch Trainee – his lifesaving efforts in March for successful CPR instructions for a patient that was not conscious and not breathing

Julie Walker – Supervisor – her lifesaving efforts in March for a patient who was not breathing

Ryan Michael – Dispatcher – his lifesaving efforts in February for successful CPR instructions for a patient that was not conscious and not breathing

Laura Patterson – Dispatcher – her lifesaving efforts in January for a patient that was found unconscious and not breathing

Additionally, we have dispatchers that follow protocols to the letter, but for a litany of reasons, patients do not survive with our assistance and that of the responders.  Those dispatchers are recognized under the umbrella of EMD Excellence.  Those dispatchers are recognized monthly for their work with the EMD Excellence Award

 

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