CRESA Always Here, Always Ready

Request Records

Would you like to request 9-1-1 or other Public Records? Visit the CRESA Public Records Portal to submit your request.

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When to Call 9-1-1

and when not to! It is important to know when you should or should not call.

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Prepare, Be Ready

and get involved! Learn how to be prepared for an emergency.

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Current Clark County Emergency Information

This page is where you would find current Clark County Emergency Information.

Currently, there are no active events in Clark County.

Flooding:

You can report standing water and storm debris on roads and in parks by going to clark.wa.gov/public-works/report-park-road. For problems that require immediate response, residents should call 564.397.2446.

Sandbags are usually avaialable at any hardware store. Sandbags are available for free at two Public Works locations:

78th Street Operations Center, 4700 NE 78th St.

149th Street Operations Center, 11609 NE 149th St.

You will need to fill your own bags (bags and sand provided) and should come prepared with a shovel. Materials are available all hours of the day, all days of the week.

Wildfire:

The Nakia Creek Fire is still considered an active fire in NE Clark County. Click Here to visit information on the Nakia Creek Fire.

Closures:

The fire area is unsafe for the public. Your presence in the closed area puts your safety as well as firefighter safety at risk. Several roads and culverts were damaged by the fire and hazards and damages continued to be assessed.  Please stay out of the closed areas.

Recreational Closures – Motorized trials and the Larch Mountain Trailhead will remain closed for the season.

Road Closures

The following road closures remain in effect to assure safety of the public while suppression and rehabilitation activities continue:

  • The roads west of the L-1500 and L-1600 Rd intersection (Jackson Pass).
  • The 1500 road east of Four Corners

Please check the interactive map link below to view and search for closed roads.

Nakia Creek Fire GIS Interactive Map

Current Evacuations and Closures

Evacuations

Currently there are no wildfires within Clark County that have resulted in evacuations

Check-In Sites

Currently none in place within Clark County

County Closures

Currently no county closures related to wildfire

Road Closures

The following road closures remain in effect to assure safety of the public while suppression and rehabilitation activities continue:

  • The roads west of the L-1500 and L-1600 Rd intersection (Jackson Pass).
  • The 1500 road east of Four Corners

Sign Up for Clark Public Alerts

By providing contact information, county residents can opt-in to receive critical emergency messaging via email, phone call, and text during times of disasters. Important messages that could be relayed include notices to evacuate, shelter-in-place, shelter locations, and other extremely important information. Read more.

Information on Other Wildfires throughout the Portland/Vancouver Metro Region

    Public Alerts Wildfires  

Your PNW Hot Weather Guide

Hotter temperatures are becoming more and more common in the PNW. When hot temperatures are expected and the NWS Portland issues a heat advisory or warning, here’s what to consider in keeping Family, Friends, and pets safe during heat-related events here in the Pacific Northwest.

Things To Consider:

  • Stay indoors and in an air-conditioned environment as much as possible unless you’re sure your body has a high tolerance for heat.
  • Drink plenty of fluids but avoid beverages that contain alcohol, caffeine or a lot of sugar.
  • Never leave any person or pet in a parked vehicle.
  • Check frequently on people who are elderly, ill or may need help. If you need help, arrange to have family, friends or neighbors check in with you at least twice a day throughout warm weather periods.
  • Make sure pets have plenty of water
  • Find a local cooling center.

If You Go Outside:

  • Plan strenuous outdoor activities for early or late in the day when temperatures are cooler; then gradually build up tolerance for warmer conditions.
  • Take frequent breaks when working outdoors.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sun block and light-colored, loose-fitting clothes when outdoors.
  • At first signs of heat illness (dizziness, nausea, headaches, muscle cramps), move to a cooler location, rest for a few minutes and slowly drink a cool beverage. Seek medical attention immediately if you do not feel better.
  • Avoid sunburn: Use a sunscreen lotion with a high SPF (sun protection factor) rating.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
  • NEVER leave anyone, especially children or pets, in a closed, parked vehicle.

Check Regularly On:

  • Infants and young children
  • People aged 65 or older
  • People who have a mental illness
  •  Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
  • Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
  • Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching

Even on hot days, many rivers and lakes in Southwest Washington remain cold:

  • Cold water − especially when high or swift − can immobilize even the strongest swimmer in minutes.
  • Know the water: Washington waters are cold enough to cause hypothermia even on the hottest summer day. Hypothermia can weaken even strong swimmers.
  • Know your limits: drowning often occurs when a swimmer tires.
  • Wear a life jacket when swimming anywhere without lifeguards or whenever you boat, jet ski, go tubing or do other water sports.
  • Ensure children wear life jackets. Inflatable toys and mattresses will not keep children safe. By law, children 12 and younger must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket or vest on all vessels 18 feet or smaller.
  • Never leave children unsupervised in or near water, even for a minute. Drowning can happen swiftly and silently. Supervision requires complete attention, even if other adults are present.
  • Always avoid alcohol when swimming or boating.

Heat Related Illness:

Although any one can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on Infants and young children, people aged 65 or older, and those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure.

Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Warning signs of heat stroke may include a body temperature above 103°F; red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating); rapid, strong pulse; throbbing headache; dizziness; nausea; confusion; and unconsciousness.

If you see any of these signs, have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the victim. Place the victim in a tub of cool water or in a cool shower, or spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose. Do not give the victim fluids to drink.

Less severe heat related illnesses include heat exhaustion and heat cramps. Signs are heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, weakness, headache and vomiting. Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. Seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last more than an hour.

Heat cramps usually affect people who sweat a lot during strenuous activity. This sweating depletes the body’s salt and moisture. The low salt level in the muscles causes painful cramps.

Clark County Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan ready for Public Comment

For the past year CRESA has been working with 17 local agencies and jurisdictions to update our 2017 Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan. 

These plans are usually updated annually as needed with a full review every five years.  Due to COVID-19, this cycle was extended for 1 year.

Now it’s your opportunity to share your thoughts on the plan. Please visit: cresa911.org/emergency-management/mitigation/, or click the links below to read the updated plans and let us know what you think by sending your comments to scott.johnson@clark.wa.gov

2022/2023 Draft Clark County Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan:
Volume 1 Planning Area-Wide Elements

Volume 2 Planning Partner Annexes

Volume 1 – Planning Area-Wide Elements

Learn more about hazard mitigation.

Planning Partners

  • Clark County
  • City of Battle Ground
  • City of Camas
  • City of La Center
  • City of Ridgefield
  • City of Vancouver
  • City of Washougal
  • Town of Yacolt
  • Vancouver School DistrictClark Public Utilities
  • Port of Vancouver
  • C-TRAN
  • Clark Regional Wastewater District
  • Battle Ground Public Schools
  • Evergreen Public Schools
  • Ridgefield School District
  • Clark County Fire District 3


Planning Proces

When it’s complete, a hazard mitigation plan should reflect a community consensus on how we will work together over several years to reduce our risks from natural disasters.   Here are the key steps in the planning process that ensure that we achieve consensus, involve stakeholders, and meet planning requirements:

1. Organize stakeholders – Identify the best representatives from local government, non-profits,  private sector, the public, and other stakeholders.

2. Involve the public – Provide multiple pathways for the public to get involved including messaging CRESA directly, through planning partners or via social media

3. Assess risks – Develop a hazard profile for the hazards of concern such as floods, earthquakes, and storms. Where do they occur? How often?  Identify resources and people at risk.

4. Develop mitigation goals, objectives, and actions – Determine how we will reduce the risks that were identified in the risk assessment.

5. Assemble the plan and get approvals – The plan must be approved by the Washington State Emergency Management Division and FEMA and then be adopted by local jurisdictions.

6. Implement the plan and monitor progress – Put the plan into action.

For more information contact:

Scott Johnson

Emergency Management Division Manager

Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency

(360) 992-6286

scott.johnson@clark.wa.gov 

Nakia Creek Fire Update 10/21/22

Shift in Weather Expected on Nakia Creek Fire

CAMAS, Wash. – Today, firefighters will continue to construct fire lines and investigate and extinguish hot spots throughout the Nakia Creek Fire. Overall, containment has increased to 30%, and the size of the fire has remained at 1,918 acres.

This afternoon is forecasted to bring much-welcome precipitation that is expected to ease fire conditions. The rain, with lifted evacuations, will offer relief to firefighters and residents alike. While the forecast is favorable, the fire remains active. For the safety of firefighters and residents alike, we ask for the public’s continued assistance in avoiding the fire perimeter and respecting closed areas.

Tonight, fire information officers will attend the Camas High School football game to be available to answer questions. Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2 appreciates the invitation to the game and the support it has received from the community.

For updated information on the fire, please use the Nakia Creek Fire Public Information Page:

https://sites.google.com/view/nakiacreek2022/homeEvacuations: All evacuations were lifted on October 20, 2022. For additional evacuation information, please refer to the Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA 911).

Nakia Creek Fire Update 10/20/22 PM

Total Current Evacuee Contacts – 0 Structures Lost – 0

Evacuations lifted on the Nakia Creek Fire

CAMAS, Wash. – All evacuation levels were lifted today and residents may return to their homes. Firefighters have made good headway, constructing fire line and connecting segments of previously held line, to help increase containment levels to 23%. Cooler temperatures moderated fire behavior which was mostly creeping and smoldering, with some isolated hotspots. Visibility increased in the afternoon, allowing aircraft to pinpoint targets on the ground for water drops. Tree fallers continued to focus on identifying and removing hazardous trees.

Calm, cool weather with elevated humidity will continue to moderate fire behavior tonight. Measurable precipitation is expected beginning in the afternoon on Friday, continuing to minimize fire growth and allowing firefighters to gain ground. Starting this weekend, weather will shift to a more typical wet fall weather pattern.

Rain after a wildland fire brings its own risks. Rain can cause burnt standing trees to fall, soil instability on steep slopes, and damage to roads. Crews will proceed with caution while working in these conditions.

Road Closures: For public safety and to minimize traffic for firefighting operations, closures will remain on the following roads:

  • Dole Valley/South of Rock Creek Campground
  • Larch Corrections Center
  • East end of Rawson Rd @ school bus turnaround (1400 rd) where the pavement meets the gravel
  • Livingston/L1000 near intersection w/1021 Rd
  • Jones Creek ORV Park
  • The roads west of the L1500 and 1600 road intersection (Jackson Pass).
  • The 1500 road east of Four Corners.

Due to the success of the fire suppression activities and the incoming wet weather, this will be the last evening update.

Card and Thank You Banner Drop Off Locations

We have several location that have been gracious enough to provide locations to drop off Thank You Cards and Signs for those involved in fighting the #NakiaCreekFire Listed below are the locations:

Fred Meyer – Fisher’s Landing: (360) 260-3300

Drop off at Customer Service

2. Fred Meyer – Orchards: (360) 896-3500

Drop off at Customer Service

3. Grocery Outlet – Orchards: (360) 314-2052

4. New Seasons – Fisher’s Landing: (360) 760-5005

5. Camas Public Library: (360) 834-4692

6. Battle Ground City Hall is also willing to be a drop off location.

We will be picking up the totes the middle of next week and distributing them to all the different fire crews invovled in fighting the Nakia Creek Fire.

Nakia Creek Fire Evacuation Zones Lifted

This morning, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency’s (CRESA 911) sent a PublicAlert message to all landline phones and registered contacts in the impacted fire evacuation zones of the Nakia Creek Fire.  The message sent by Emergency Management stated that fire evacuation zones impacted have been removed.  

The message included a web link, http://cresa911.org/blog,  to direct people where to go to verify where road closures are still in place.  The message shared was:

“This is a message from CRESA 911 and the Washington Department of Natural Resources. We previously notified you of evacuations in your area related to the Nakia Creek Fire. At this time, all evacuation zones have been removed.  This is still an active fire and parts of the area will remain closed until further notice. For fire updates please visit http://cresa911.org/blog. We appreciate your cooperation.”

Updated Fire Map/Road Closures
Nakia Creek Fire Perimeter and Road Closures 10/20/22 (pdf)

As a reminder this is still an active fire.  Smoke and even some burning within the fire lines will continue for some time.  Roads on State and Federal Land where the fire is still burning will remain closed.  CRESA Emergency Management encourages residents to continue monitoring fire information while remaining “Alert and Ready.” 

Individuals needing assistance or who may not have access to the internet can call the CRESA Call Center at 360-992-9229 for assistance to determine what roads are still closed.

Please do not call 9-1-1 or 3-1-1 regarding fire information or assistance with evacuation zones. 

Thank You.

Nakia Creek Fire Update 10/20/22 AM

CAMAS, Wash. – Firefighters continue to make progress on the Nakia Creek Fire northeast of Camas, Washington. Improved weather conditions aided firefighters, who continued constructing handlines around the fire and mopping up hot spots. Yesterday, evacuation restrictions were reduced in some areas. Please refer to the evacuation section below for the most up-to-date information. Overall, containment has increased to 23%, and the size of the fire has slightly grown to 1,918 acres, an increase of 49 acres since Wednesday morning. Small growth is expected as handline construction is completed.

On Wednesday, visibility improved, allowing air resources to aid the suppression effort. Aircraft were able to focus on hot spots in steep, hard-to-reach areas of the fire.  Managers hope to continue to utilize air resources in the suppression effort today. A Temporary Flight Restriction has been implemented around the fire to limit any aircraft not associated with firefighting activities in the airspace.

Firefighter safety is a primary objective. Tree fellers are being utilized to remove dangerous trees weakened by the fire and pose a safety hazard. For firefighter and public safety, road and forest closures are in place, limiting entrance to residential traffic. We ask for the public’s assistance in avoiding roads and areas where firefighters are actively working.

Looking forward, a weather system will move into the region on Friday, bringing typical rainy fall weather.  Rainfall amounts from Friday afternoon are predicted to be half to one inch. Rain will taper off Saturday morning, with wet weather returning Saturday evening and continuing through Sunday.  Extended forecasts predict a more normal weather pattern will remain, bringing an end to an unusually dry start to fall across the region.

Evacuations: Evacuation levels from the Clark County Sheriff’s Office are evaluated daily. Residents can search their address for current evacuation levels here: https://tinyurl.com/NakiaCreekEvacs

Evacuations also include the Larch Mountain Corrections Center. Please check with the Washington Department of Corrections for further information.

Sign up for county alerts: http://cresa911.org/emergency-management/alerts-warnings/

Nakia Creek Fire Update 10/19/22 PM

Crews making progress on Nakia Creek Fire

CAMAS, Wash. – Weather conditions today were favorable to firefighting efforts.  Cooler temperatures and higher humidity moderated fire behavior.  Skies cleared in the afternoon increasing visibility allowing the use of aircraft which focused on hot spots on the northeast corner of the fire. Ground resources continued improving containment lines in the southern area along Jones Creek and along the western portion of the fire perimeter.  Tomorrow tree fallers begin identifying hazardous trees for removal. A large spot fire near Four Corners merged with the main body of the fire and fire personnel continued working on keeping the fire from moving outside of the containment lines. Fire containment improved to 23%, and the size of the fire is 1,869 acres.

Today, four Type 1 helicopters, three Type 2 helicopters, two CL415 water scooper planes and an air attack platform remained assigned along with 553 personnel.

Looking forward, firefighters are monitoring the incoming weather patterns, including a slight increase of westerly winds predicted on Thursday afternoon. Flare-ups are more likely to occur in these conditions, and these factors are being discussed in both the team’s 48- and 72-hour operations plans. On Friday, rain is expected to start and continue into the weekend, which, while helpful in extinguishing hot spots, presents its own safety challenges, particularly on steep, muddy terrain.

Evacuations: Evacuation levels decreased today allowing some residents to return.  To find out the most current information on evacuation levels or to sign up for emergency mobile alerts visit: http://cresa911.org/.

Evacuations also include the Larch Mountain Corrections Center. Please check with the Washington Department of Corrections for further information.

Kalama, Black Hole, Siouxon, Sunset Fire Update –

Fire Update – October 22, 2022

This morning, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency’s (CRESA 911)  in conjunction with Clark County and Skamania County  lifted the fire evacuation zone for contact in the impacted fire evacuation zones of the Black Hole Fire.  Fire evacuation zones have been removed.  

As a reminder this is still an active fire.  Smoke and even some burning within the fire lines will continue for some time.  Roads on State and Federal Land where the fire is still burning will remain closed.  CRESA Emergency Management encourages residents to continue monitoring fire information while remaining “Alert and Ready.” 

For further updates on this fire please visit: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8436/

Please do not call 9-1-1 or 3-1-1 regarding fire information or assistance with evacuation zones. 

Thank You.

Fire Evacuation Zones (arcgis.com)

Fire Update- October 21, 2022

Overview:  This will be the last update from the Sierra Front/ Nevada Type 3 IMT. Command of the Kalama Fire will be returned to the Gifford Pinchot National Forest at 0700 on Saturday October 22. Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team 3 will assume command of the Siouxon and Sunset fires on Saturday morning, October 22. Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team will be assuming command of the Black Hole Fire on October 22. Future fire updates on the Kalama Fire will be posted twice a week, or as fire activity dictates, on the Kalama Fire Inciweb page (https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8420/) and the Gifford-Pinchot National Forest Facebook page. Updates on the Siouxon and Sunset Fires will continue to be provided daily on the Siouxon and Sunset Fire Inciweb page (https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8436/) and on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest Facebook page.  

Fire Behavior:  Fire fighters on the Kalama fire continue working on suppression repair activities. Acreage remains at 500 acres and containment remains at 43%.  The Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires currently have no containment and are currently at 2396 acres, 605 acres, and 277 acres respectively, with minimal growth.  Crews will continue to conduct suppression operations and assessing the need for additional resources.  There will continue to be multiple road closures in the area of the Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires.  The public is asked to stay clear of the fire areas so firefighters can safely do their work.  

Weather: Today’s weather will be cloudy with occasional rain. Maximum temperatures around 56 degrees with light winds and humidity around 75-85%.

 Closures:  Current closures remain in place for the Kalama Fire- View Closure Map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1065297.pdf  

Trails: Cinnamon Trail #204, Kalama Ski Trail #231, Toutle Trail #238, Fossil Trail #242, Kalama Falls Trail #242A, Goat Marsh Trail 231D

Roads: Current Road closures.

  • NFS Road No. 8100, from the junction of DNR Road 7200 and DNR Road 7600 to the junction with NFS Road No. 8123 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8100.       
  • NFS Road No 8117 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8117.   
  • NFS Road No. 8122 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8122.        

Attention Climbers: *Access to Climbers Bivouac (and climbing route) is open.

 Additional road closures in the areas of the Sunset, Siouxon, and Black Hole fires will be announced pending forest Closure orders.

Evacuations:   The evacuation level for the Kalama Fire remains at Level 1 “Ready” from the headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River to south of Merrill  Lake, and from the Skamania/Cowlitz County Border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.  All current road closures remain in effect. Level 1 “Ready” has also been ordered in the area around Chelatchie, Amboy and Yacolt.  See attached map for Level 1 evacuation area.

View an evacuation map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1060104.pdf Level 1, Ready Evacuation Level:

  • North to South: From the Headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River, south to Forest Road 7550.
  • East to West: From the Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.
  • North to South: South from Forest Road 7550 to south of Merrill Lake.
  • East to West: Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County

Sign up for county alerts: https://www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/196/Emergency-Management

Fire Information Phone Line: 360-449-7874

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8420    

Forest Website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/gp/fire       

Kalama, Black Hole, Siouxon, Sunset Fire Update – 10-20-2022

Overview:   The Sierra Front/Nevada Incident Management Team 5 continues to work closely with local officials from the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Washington Department of Natural Resources to effectively and efficiently manage shared resources currently on the fires and continue assessing needs for additional resources.   

Fire Behavior:  Fire fighters on the Kalama fire continue working on suppression repair activities and cleaning drainages and culverts in anticipation of the predicted rainfall.  Acreage is currently at 500 acres and containment increased to 43%. Crews will continue to reinforce lines on the fire and monitor fire activity.  The Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires currently have no containment and are currently at 2359 acres, 561 acres, and 277 acres respectively, with moderate growth.  Crews will continue to conduct suppression operations and assessing the need for additional resources.  There will continue to be multiple road closures in the area of the Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires.  The public is asked to stay clear of the fire areas so firefighters can safely do their work.  

Weather: Today’s weather will be partly sunny with 55-65% cloud cover. Maximum temperatures around 70 degrees with light winds and humidity around 45-55%.

 Closures:  Current closures remain in place for the Kalama Fire- View Closure Map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1065297.pdf  

Trails: Cinnamon Trail #204, Kalama Ski Trail #231, Toutle Trail #238, Fossil Trail #242, Kalama Falls Trail #242A, Goat Marsh Trail 231D

Roads: Current Road closures.

  • NFS Road No. 8100, from the junction of DNR Road 7200 and DNR Road 7600 to the junction with NFS Road No. 8123 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8100.       
  • NFS Road No 8117 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8117.   
  • NFS Road No. 8122 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8122.        

Attention Climbers: *Access to Climbers Bivouac (and climbing route) is open.

 Additional road closures in the areas of the Sunset, Siouxon, and Black Hole fires will be announced pending forest Closure orders.

Evacuations:   The evacuation level for the Kalama Fire remains at Level 1 “Ready” from the headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River to south of Merrill  Lake, and from the Skamania/Cowlitz County Border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.  All current road closures remain in effect. Level 1 “Ready” has also been ordered in the area around Chelatchie, Amboy and Yacolt.  See attached map for Level 1 evacuation area.

View an evacuation map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1060104.pdf

Level 1, Ready Evacuation Level:

  • North to South: From the Headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River, south to Forest Road 7550.
  • East to West: From the Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.
  • North to South: South from Forest Road 7550 to south of Merrill Lake.
  • East to West: Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County

Sign up for county alerts: https://www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/196/Emergency-Management

Size: 500 acres with potential for growth. Containment: 43% Cause: Under investigation.

Fire Information Phone Line: 360-449-7874

Public Information Officer: Nate Leising: 775-720-2749

Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/8420    

Forest Website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/gp/fire       

Kalama, Black Hole, Siouxon, Sunset Fire Update – 10-19-2022

Overview:   The Sierra Front/Nevada Incident Management Team 5 continues to work closely with local officials from the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Washington Department of Natural Resources to effectively and efficiently manage shared resources currently on the fires and continue assessing needs for additional resources.   

Fire Behavior:  Fire fighters on the Kalama fire are progressing well on suppression repair activities.  Acreage remains at 495 acres and containment remains at 37%. Crews will continue to reinforce lines on the fire and monitor fire activity.  The Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires currently have no containment and remain at 2000 acres, 410 acres, and 187 acres respectively, with no reported growth.  Crews will continue to conduct suppression operations and assessing the need for additional resources.  There will continue to be multiple road closures in the area of the Siouxon, Black Hole, and Sunset Fires.  The public is asked to stay clear of the fire areas so firefighters can safely do their work.  

Weather: Today’s weather will continue to be mostly sunny with some haze. Maximum temperatures around 75 with light winds and humidity around 35%.

 Closures:  Current closures remain in place for the Kalama Fire- View Closure Map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1065297.pdf  

Trails: Cinnamon Trail #204, Kalama Ski Trail #231, Toutle Trail #238, Fossil Trail #242, Kalama Falls Trail #242A, Goat Marsh Trail 231D

Roads: Current Road closures.

  • NFS Road No. 8100, from the junction of DNR Road 7200 and DNR Road 7600 to the junction with NFS Road No. 8123 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8100.       
  • NFS Road No 8117 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8117.   
  • NFS Road No. 8122 and all associated NFS spur roads off NFS Road No. 8122.        

Attention Climbers: *Access to Climbers Bivouac (and climbing route) is open.

 Additional road closures in the areas of the Sunset, Siouxon, and Black Hole fires will be announced pending forest Closure orders.

Evacuations:   The evacuation level for the Kalama Fire remains at Level 1 “Ready” from the headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River to south of Merrill  Lake, and from the Skamania/Cowlitz County Border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.  All current road closures remain in effect. Level 1 “Ready” has also been ordered in the area around Chelatchie, Amboy and Yacolt.  See attached map for Level 1 evacuation area.

View an evacuation map: https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd1060104.pdf

Level 1, Ready Evacuation Level:

  • North to South: From the Headwaters of the South Fork of the Toutle River, south to Forest Road 7550.
  • East to West: From the Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County.
  • North to South: South from Forest Road 7550 to south of Merrill Lake.
  • East to West: Skamania County/Cowlitz County border west 5 miles into Cowlitz County

Sign up for county alerts: https://www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/196/Emergency-Management

Nakia Creek Fire Update 10/19/2 AM

NAKIA CREEK FIRE A.M. UPDATE

Minimal Growth on Nakia Creek Fire

CAMAS, Wash. – Weather conditions overnight aided firefighters on the Nakia Creek Fire, once again decreasing natural fire behavior. Between cooler temperatures, higher relative humidity and minimal wind, flare-ups on the line were minimal and crews were able to steadily continue creating containment lines and mopping up hot spots that have the potential to spread. Overall, containment remains at 12%, and the size of the fire has slightly increased to 1,869 acres, up just 73 acres from Tuesday morning. This small growth is expected as resources work to complete fire lines.

Weather continues to be a big factor in the Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2’s operational planning. On Monday, dense fog and smoky conditions hindered the use of aircraft, removing the use of a vital resource assigned to the incident. Today, there’s significantly less fog and smoke in the area, and managers are hopeful that aircraft will be able to fly the fire, dropping water on areas that are difficult and sometimes dangerous to reach on the ground. Four Type 1 helicopters, three Type 2 helicopters, two CL415 water scooper planes and an air attack platform remain assigned to the fire and additional aircraft are available to call in if needed.

Firefighters working on the ground today are continuing to complete fire line and bolster existing containment lines to keep the fire in check. This is extremely hard work that often involves hiking on steep terrain with a 45-pound backpack, hand tools, chainsaws and water throughout a 12-hour shift. Firefighters use these tools to break up vegetation so spreading fire hits the bare dirt and can’t grow beyond that point. This is the most important work at this stage in the fire in order to keep its size as small as possible. Safety on the line and on the roads surrounding the fire remains a top priority.

Looking forward, firefighters are monitoring the incoming weather patterns, including a slight increase of east winds and warmer temperatures predicted on Thursday. Flare-ups are more likely to occur in these conditions, and these factors are being discussed in both the team’s 48- and 72-hour operations plans. On Friday, rain is expected to start and continue into the weekend, which, while helpful in extinguishing hot spots, presents its own safety challenges, particularly on steep, muddy terrain.

Evacuations: Evacuation levels from the Clark County Sheriff’s Office are being evaluated daily but have not changed as of 9 a.m. on Oct. 19, 2022. Residents can search their address for current evacuation levels here: https://tinyurl.com/NakiaCreekEvacs

Evacuations also include the Larch Mountain Corrections Center. Please check with the Washington Department of Corrections for further information.

Sign up for county alerts: http://cresa911.org/emergency-management/alerts-warnings/

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